What Records Will the Bankruptcy Trustee Require

The bankruptcy system is built on trust. It really isn’t designed that way, at least not intentionally, but this trust system has developed from necessity. The volume of bankruptcy cases necessitates that bankruptcy trustees accept most debtor statements without verification, and rely on the examination of a few records for the rest. Many of these records are mandated by the Bankruptcy Code or Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure. Other records are required by the local rules of the bankruptcy court. Finally, the bankruptcy trustee may request other debtor records.

 

All debtors are required to submit a copy of the last filed tax return and pay advices for the past 60 days to the bankruptcy trustee. In addition, most trustees will request some or all of the following documents, but all of these documents should be delivered to the debtor’s attorney for analysis prior to the case filing:

 

  1. Last six months of pay check stubs for all jobs, and profit/loss statements for any business. All income information from the past six full months is needed in order to complete the bankruptcy Means Test. For a W-2 employee, this information can be obtained from the debtor’s employer or human resources office. The debtor is also obligated to send copies of all pay advices received within the last six months to the bankruptcy trustee.
  2. Last two years of income tax returns. The Statement of Financial Affairs requires income information for earnings during the past two years. The bankruptcy trustee may also request this information.
  3. Real estate deeds and mortgage paperwork. Some bankruptcy trustees require copies of real estate deeds. It is always a good idea for the debtor’s attorney to have copies of real estate records so that ownership interests in property can be properly ascertained. This is not a good time to “forget” about a timeshare in Florida, or that the debtor’s name is on the deed to his mother’s house.
  4. Vehicle titles along with lease or purchase agreements. Similar to real estate deeds, the bankruptcy trustee may require production of vehicle titles and purchase agreements (also called promissory notes). In many cases a perfected security interest can help the debtor keep a vehicle, or lower Chapter 13 plan payments, so it is in the debtor’s best interest to ensure that this paperwork gets to his attorney for review.
  5. All loan paperwork. This includes personal loans to banks, finance companies or payday lenders; personal guarantees; and co-signor agreements (which may include agreements guaranteeing a child’s student loan or apartment lease).
  6. All unexpired contracts. The debtor may have the opportunity to accept or reject a contract, like for a cell phone or satellite television.
  7. Appraisal paperwork for real estate or personal property. Appraisals aid in developing a strategy to protect the debtor’s property.
  8. Any tax bill showing assessed value. Property assessments are useful when discussing real estate values with the trustee.
  9. Any child support or maintenance (alimony) court order. Most domestic support orders are not dischargeable, but some are. The prudent debtor will discuss the situation with his attorney.
  10. Most recent credit reports. Credit reports contains useful information like creditor addresses, the date obligations were incurred, and collection agency contact information. The federal law entitles consumers to receive a free, no-obligation, no credit card required credit report once each year from each credit reporting agency.
  11. Information regarding debts, including bills and collection letters. Credit reports are a great start, but the most practical way to obtain creditor information is to save periodic bills received by mail.
  12. Documents that impact income, assets, debts, or expenses.       Examples of this are a foreclosure notice, or a notice of an upcoming bonus or commission.
  13. Investment records. Some investments are exemptible, other are not. All investments, including retirement accounts, should be reviewed prior to filing.
  14. Life insurance policy with a cash surrender value. Term life insurance policies generally have no value. Other life insurance policies may be exemptible assets.
  15. Last six months of bank statements. Every bankruptcy trustee will ask for bank statements. The debtor’s attorney must review bank statements to uncover suspicious transactions before filing the case.
  16. Proof of insurance on all property secured by a lien. Creditors (and sometimes the trustee) will request proof of insurance to ensure that a secured asset is being protected and safeguarded by the debtor.

Documents pertaining to legal claims or pending lawsuits, including lawsuits filed by the debtor. The debtor’s attorney needs lawsuit information to determine whether the debtor/plaintiff will be able to maintain a lawsuit during bankruptcy or keep any money judgment. The debtor’s attorney also requires lawsuit information when the debtor is a defendant to notify the federal or state court to stop the case once the bankruptcy case is filed.